Fayette Animal Control numbers: More dogs and cats saved

1
1410
Fayette County Animal Shelter on Ga. Highway 74 South in Peachtree City. Photo/Ben Nelms.
Fayette County Animal Shelter on Ga. Highway 74 South in Peachtree City. Photo/Ben Nelms.

Figures released by Fayette County Animal Control covering the past three years showed live releases of dogs and cats increasing from 93 percent in 2017, to 96.45 percent in 2018 and 97.85 percent in 2019.

Fayette County Clerk Tameca White noted that Fayette County Animal Control has faced challenges over the past few years. Discussions of cats and dogs, spayed and neutered, capacity and renovations, saturated the Board of Commissioners meetings and the local newspapers in 2017.

Now that the new year, new decade has arrived, here’s a glance of how the county, with the help of the Animal Shelter staff, volunteers and rescue groups working together have brought commendable animal control statistics in the past three years, said White.

Fayette County Animal Control Director Jerry Collins provided a breakdown of the 2017 numbers, with the year ending with a live release at 93 percent. Live release percentages increased to 96.45 percent in 2018 and 97.85 percent in 2019.

Pertaining to the data for each of the past three years, Collins said:

In 2017, Animal Control handled 922 animals through intake, which is an average of 2.5 animals a day.

There were 454 dogs and 422 cats that came in through intake and 177 dogs and 176 cats that were adopted. One-hundred and ninety-four dogs and 33 cats were reclaimed in 2017.

With the assistance of local rescue groups, 91 dogs and 184 cats were rescued.

In 2017, there was a total of 22 dogs that were euthanized or died under shelter care (while at vet) and 37 cats were euthanized or died under shelter care (while at vet).

The shelter had 43.7 percent of dogs returned to their owners, and 8 percent of cats returned to their owner.

The live release rate total was 93 percent. In dogs alone the total was 95 percent and for cats the total was 91 percent.

In 2018, the county would see various changes in these numbers in the following year. Specifically, an increase in the number of live release rates for both dogs and cats, a topic of high importance for animal advocates in the community.

Also in 2018, the county animal staff handled 924 animals through intake, which is an average of 2.53 animals a day: 543 dogs and 364 cats.

The adoption rates decreased slightly from 2017, with 166 dogs and 107 cats being adopted in 2018. There were 265 dogs reclaimed and 19 cats reclaimed.

In 2018, the total number of dogs that went to rescue was 105, and 214 cats went to rescue in 2018. The shelter had six dogs that were euthanized or died under shelter care (while at vet) and 22 cats were euthanized or died under shelter care (while at vet). That is a 73 percent decrease from the prior year.

A total of 49 percent of dogs were returned to their owner and 5 percent of cats were returned to their owners.

The live release rate total for 2018 increased to 96.45 percent. Both dogs and cats showed an increase at year end: dogs were 98.9 percent and cats were 94 percent.

In 2019, Animal Control saw even higher percentage of successes. In 2019, the shelter handled 966 total animals through intake which is an average of 2.6 animals a day.

The breakdown showed 563 dogs and 350 cats coming in though intake: 145 dogs and 126 cats were adopted; 302 dogs were reclaimed by their owner and 19 cats were reclaimed; and 120 dogs and 216 cats went to rescue;

Also in 2019, three dogs and 12 cats were euthanized or died under shelter care (while at vet). Additionally, 53.7 percent of all dogs were returned to their owners and 5.5 percent of cats were returned to their owners.

The live release rate total was 97.85 percent, with dogs at 99.45 percent and cats at 96.25 percent.

“As you can see, the yearly intake numbers have increased and so has the live release rates. The staff continues to do an outstanding job getting owned animals back to their owners,” said County Administrator Steve Rapson. “Our staff, volunteers and rescue partners are doing an excellent job for the animals in this county.”