‘Share the road’ with bikers law has some new rules for drivers

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Share the road sign isolated on white background.

There is a new law pertaining to cyclists riding on roadways that Georgia motorists need to know.

Sheriff Barry Babb said the new “3 Feet Law” deals with motorists passing cyclists on roadways.

Babb said the new law, which became effective July 1, requires drivers to give people riding bicycles three feet of space on the state’s roads when passing.

Babb said the new law not only says to give cyclists three feet, but also requires:

• If there’s an available lane, you are required to get over

• You can now cross a double yellow or white line to give three feet of space

• If you can’t cross the line because of oncoming traffic, you must slow down at least 10 miles per hour when passing.

Signed into law as O.C.G.A. 40-6-56, the new bicycle safety law took effect July 1.

Violations are considered a misdemeanor and carry a fine of up to $250.

9 COMMENTS

  1. As a former cyclist, this is good law, but it’s not that 99% of the driving population won’t follow it, they won’t even know it. And won’t care. And still think cyclists belong on the sidewalk. That’s why I’m a former cyclist- one too many close calls. I never rode two abreast.

  2. Actually, the “3 Feet Law” became effective in 2014. The statute was amended this year and added the above bullet points.

    As for lane positioning, a bicycle can take the lane if the that lane is too narrow for both the bicycle and a motor vehicle to occupy.

    § 40-6-294

    b) Every person operating a bicycle upon a roadway shall ride as near to the right side of the roadway as practicable, except when:

    (3) The lane is too narrow to share safely with a motor vehicle;

    Be careful out there.

    • Those last two points are important. Most cyclists are respectful of motorists and cautious. But I’ve had more than a few ride 2 or 3 abreast in the road to prevent passing, or swerve out in the lane without any signal so they could make a left, or – my favorite – blow a stop sign and yeet into an intersection in front of oncoming traffic. Most motorists are lucky to avoid collisions with things that aren’t as hard to see as a cyclist.

      • …or swerve out in the lane without any signal so they could make a left, or – my favorite – blow a stop sign and yeet into an intersection in front of oncoming traffic.

        Those individuals are the ones you read about in the paper and resulting outcome is, well is not good for the cyclist.