From principal to writer: Dr. Lisa Moore inspires educators with new book

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Dr. Lisa Moore, principal at North Fayette Elementary. Photo/Fayette County School System.
Dr. Lisa Moore, principal at North Fayette Elementary. Photo/Fayette County School System.

It takes most people months or even years to write a book, but one Fayette principal beat all the odds and wrote a book in less than 24 hours.

Dr. Lisa Moore, principal at North Fayette Elementary, wanted to help educators learn the importance of people-centered leadership rather than task-centered leadership in her new book “Dealing with Difficult Parents: Using a Circle of Influence Instead of a Circle of Authority,” which provides practical tools and strategies for assisting highly effective leaders in creating a circle of influence when dealing with difficult parents.

“Truthfully, I wrote the book because I overheard my secretary, Julie Young, telling someone that the angriest parent can come in to meet with me and when the parent leaves, they act like they are my best friend. When I thought about it, it was true. But it had not always been like that. It was because of some skills that I developed along the way,” Moore says this was the inspiration behind her book.

Although the original book only took Moore 10 hours to write, she was hesitant to publish it. After two years, a doctorate degree, and a few edits later, she finally published her book. “I have made many mistakes as an educator for the past 24 years, and if I can assist someone else from making those same mistakes, or help in making a situation a little easier, then I have met my goal. Publishing this book was the only way to do that,” she says.

This book has even influenced her own leadership role at North Fayette Elementary, “It helps me to encourage my students and staff to set goals and to do something each day to meet that goal. As a leader, I am my staff and students’ biggest cheerleader, and I want to see them meet all of their aspirations and goals.”

Beyond the practical skills, statistics, and data, Moore says she wants people to know that if they truly want to create a positive culture of collaboration in their school, they must lead by using a circle of influence rather than a circle of authority.

“If it worked for me, then why not share it with others and possibly save them some unnecessary stress,” Moore says.

Seeing this book come full circle has inspired Moore to potentially start a series of education-related materials called “Moore2Learn.”

Moore’s book is available in both Kindle and paperback through Amazon; it is also available in E-Book version at Barnes and Noble (Nook) and Apple Books.