2 Home Depot workers charged with ripping off their employer

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Two employees of the Home Depot store in Peachtree City were recently arrested on felony theft charges. One of the men made fraudulent refund returns totaling more than $500. The other employee stole more than $8,000 in merchandise, removing items from the store and pretending that the merchandise had been purchased by customers.

In one of the cases, 51-year-old Fayetteville resident Marcus Johnson was arrested at the Home Depot on Aug. 27 and charged with felony by taking, according to Peachtree City Police Department spokesman Chris Hyatt.

Hyatt said the investigation showed that Johnson had made fraudulent refund returns on multiple occasions beginning in March, and in an amount exceeding $500.

In the case of the other employee, 50-year-old Demone E. Solomon, also of Fayetteville, was charged with felony theft by taking, Hyatt said.

Police on Aug. 27 were notified by a Home Depot Asset Protection agent that Solomon was being interviewed by district management for theft of merchandise from the store during his shift.

Hyatt said the investigation determined that Solomon on multiple occasions from June through August had removed items from the store, pretending the items had been purchased by customers. Solomon kept the merchandise, which amounted to more than $8,000 in value.

16 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks “Stranger” I respect “behavioral economist”.
    My Dad was a “behavioral economist”, too.
    Born 1918, youngest of 9 children, his mother was illiterate and possibly part Cherokee, managed a 6th grade education, never spent more than he made, avoided debt, after WW2 worked 30 years for Ford, paid off his home at age 50, built 2 income producing rental properties, retired at 60, sold the rentals, toured the world, was properly insured, taught me the same “behavioral economist” lessons….which I applied in my life….anyone….I repeat ….anyone can do it.

  2. Souper and Mr. Hardy – If by “demographics” you are referring to the factors identified by the FBI “known to affect the volume and type of crime occurring from place to place,” it would be difficult to argue with you:
    • Population density and degree of urbanization.
    • Variations in composition of the population, particularly youth concentration.
    • Stability of the population with respect to residents’ mobility, commuting patterns, and transient factors.
    • Modes of transportation and highway system.
    • Economic conditions, including median income, poverty level, and job availability.
    • Cultural factors and educational, recreational, and religious characteristics.
    • Family conditions with respect to divorce and family cohesiveness.
    • Climate.
    • Effective strength of law enforcement agencies.
    • Administrative and investigative emphases of law enforcement.
    • Policies of other components of the criminal justice system (i.e., prosecutorial, judicial, correctional, and probational).
    • Citizens’ attitudes toward crime.
    • Crime reporting practices of the citizenry.

    If, on the other hand, you are cherry picking from these factors based on your intuition and availability heuristic, no amount of explaining will effectively cover your hind parts. Since neither of you specify which “demographics” you are citing, many will assume that you are using the well-worn, good ole boy dog whistle. Since I have no way of knowing, I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt.

    • Aw’ Gee Stranger…you are way too data driven for me….I just use my skills of observation and having seen the slow ebb of lawlessness that now is an everyday occurrence in PTC/Fayette Co. I have my personal read on what’s g’wan on.
      Don’t need a “well-worn, good ole boy dog whistle” when most of the crime is obviously distressing to anyone who lives here…and they aren’t al like me either.

      • O.K. Mr. Hardy, so you are relying on the availability heuristic, or as Nobel laureate, Daniel Kahneman, explains it: “What you see is all there is.” Kahneman’s book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow” should be on everyone’s reading list.

        • I promise that I will check out that book and offer my report once I finish “Do No Harm” by Henry Marsh, a British brain surgeon.
          Will Mr. Kahneman attempt to teach me to have empathy for criminals or persuade me that personal actions/choices don’t count?
          We live in an end time for personal responsibility as our societal structure withers,
          Are you not afraid?

          • Mr. Hardy – Dr. Kahneman is a behavioral economist. He has no political agenda. He expertly describes how we think and process information.

  3. Hey Guys…was not trying to be funny…just a CYA (Cover My A#@) if some liberal decided I was racist…I agree that the definition was needed because certain demographics who will read my comments are without any objective common sense as our society degrades into a non-functioning mass of adults.

  4. Marcus and Demone are 51 and 50 years old respectively. That is a real problem, older men doing this sort of theft…this means that they probably have children out there with the same skill set and perpetuating what is a systemic problem within their demographic.
    “Demographic”:
    Demographics are the various characteristics of a population. Examples of demographics can include factors such as the race, sex and age of a population that is being studied. The statistical information of the population’s socioeconomic conditions is known as demographic data.

      • Nothing funny about it… It’s completely accurate. This “demographic” is responsible for the vast majority of crimes in the US, both violent and property crimes. You can pretend it’s not true because you don’t want it to be, but it is reality.

        • You miss the humor and the point. Posting a definition along with a word usage is a clear (to some) communication from the author. That communication is that they expect the reader to be ignorant and/or cognitively limited such that they wouldn’t understand the definition and context without it. It was in insult, and a funny one at that.

          I happen to agree with the author on all points, including the need to post the definition.

    • Nothing funny about it… It’s completely accurate. This “demographic” is responsible for the vast majority of crimes in the US, both violent and property crimes. You can pretend it’s not true because you don’t want it to be, but it is reality.

      • Offense charged Total White “Black or
        African
        American” “American
        Indian or
        Alaska
        Native” Asian “Native
        Hawaiian
        or Other
        Pacific
        Islander” Total White “Black or
        African
        American” “American
        Indian or
        Alaska
        Native” Asian “Native
        Hawaiian
        or Other
        Pacific
        Islander” Total2 “Hispanic
        or
        Latino” “Not
        Hispanic
        or Latino”
        TOTAL 6,816,975 4,729,290 1,815,144 164,852 86,733 20,956 100.0 69.4 26.6 2.4 1.3 0.3 5,896,059 1,126,806 4,769,253
        Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 7,964 3,650 4,078 125 83 28 100.0 45.8 51.2 1.6 1.0 0.4 6,474 1,341 5,133
        Rape3 16,599 11,588 4,427 249 276 59 100.0 69.8 26.7 1.5 1.7 0.4 14,172 3,948 10,224
        Robbery 56,305 25,143 29,677 635 568 282 100.0 44.7 52.7 1.1 1.0 0.5 50,705 12,002 38,703
        Aggravated assault 274,376 169,467 91,164 7,192 4,902 1,651 100.0 61.8 33.2 2.6 1.8 0.6 243,279 62,421 180,858
        Burglary 118,843 81,104 34,188 1,728 1,464 359 100.0 68.2 28.8 1.5 1.2 0.3 105,558 21,981 83,577
        Larceny-theft 592,679 393,226 178,937 11,718 7,133 1,665 100.0 66.3 30.2 2.0 1.2 0.3 502,776 74,227 428,549
        Motor vehicle theft 57,278 38,719 16,409 1,213 721 216 100.0 67.6 28.6 2.1 1.3 0.4 50,482 12,720 37,762
        Arson 6,291 4,453 1,553 121 125 39 100.0 70.8 24.7 1.9 2.0 0.6 5,460 1,022 4,438
        Violent crime4 355,244 209,848 129,346 8,201 5,829 2,020 100.0 59.1 36.4 2.3 1.6 0.6 314,630 79,712 234,918
        Property crime4 775,091 517,502 231,087 14,780 9,443 2,279 100.0 66.8 29.8 1.9 1.2 0.3 664,276 109,950 554,326
        Other assaults 703,534 455,901 219,400 16,037 9,907 2,289 100.0 64.8 31.2 2.3 1.4 0.3 608,510 115,069 493,441
        Forgery and counterfeiting 32,100 21,537 9,668 338 501 56 100.0 67.1 30.1 1.1 1.6 0.2 28,277 4,786 23,491
        Fraud 78,698 51,861 24,041 1,424 1,208 164 100.0 65.9 30.5 1.8 1.5 0.2 68,160 9,984 58,176
        Embezzlement 9,886 5,983 3,587 114 179 23 100.0 60.5 36.3 1.2 1.8 0.2 8,271 1,099 7,172
        Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 63,035 38,751 21,998 1,108 825 353 100.0 61.5 34.9 1.8 1.3 0.6 54,930 10,331 44,599
        Vandalism 126,161 86,360 34,670 3,198 1,598 335 100.0 68.5 27.5 2.5 1.3 0.3 109,856 21,333 88,523
        Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 108,847 60,494 45,530 1,129 1,247 447 100.0 55.6 41.8 1.0 1.1 0.4 92,892 22,081 70,811
        Prostitution and commercialized vice 19,811 10,074 8,370 73 1,205 89 100.0 50.9 42.2 0.4 6.1 0.4 18,191 3,506 14,685
        Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 28,627 21,360 5,903 596 668 100 100.0 74.6 20.6 2.1 2.3 0.3 25,184 7,023 18,161
        Drug abuse violations 1,052,101 748,874 274,670 14,098 11,857 2,602 100.0 71.2 26.1 1.3 1.1 0.2 946,784 194,654 752,130
        Gambling 1,895 1,081 553 13 214 34 100.0 57.0 29.2 0.7 11.3 1.8 1,682 434 1,248
        Offenses against the family and children 58,042 38,196 16,454 2,821 493 78 100.0 65.8 28.3 4.9 0.8 0.1 49,402 6,443 42,959
        Driving under the influence 646,607 526,928 90,888 12,373 13,071 3,347 100.0 81.5 14.1 1.9 2.0 0.5 549,292 145,127 404,165
        Liquor laws 109,887 85,350 17,077 5,657 1,651 152 100.0 77.7 15.5 5.1 1.5 0.1 90,033 14,802 75,231
        Drunkenness 218,095 164,797 32,255 18,238 2,431 374 100.0 75.6 14.8 8.4 1.1 0.2 206,492 46,634 159,858
        Disorderly conduct 208,690 132,676 64,049 9,811 1,820 334 100.0 63.6 30.7 4.7 0.9 0.2 164,645 22,897 141,748
        Vagrancy 15,952 10,763 4,497 473 201 18 100.0 67.5 28.2 3.0 1.3 0.1 14,779 2,109 12,670
        All other offenses (except traffic) 2,192,791 1,532,998 577,689 54,049 22,248 5,807 100.0 69.9 26.3 2.5 1.0 0.3 1,870,588 306,544 1,564,044
        Suspicion 1,316 1,008 257 49 2 0 100.0 76.6 19.5 3.7 0.2 0.0 410 37 373
        Curfew and loitering law violations 10,565 6,948 3,155 272 135 55 100.0 65.8 29.9 2.6 1.3 0.5 8,775 2,251 6,524
        1 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to 100.0.
        2 The ethnicity totals are representative of those agencies that provided ethnicity breakdowns. Not all agencies provide ethnicity data; therefore, the race and ethnicity totals will not equal.
        3 The rape figures in this table are aggregate totals of the data submitted based on both the legacy and revised Uniform Crime Reporting definitions.
        4 Violent crimes are offenses of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.