Brainstorming the future of Peachtree City

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The Peachtree City Council on Dec. 3 held an informal meeting to talk about potential future goals. Pictured, from left, are, Councilman Mike King, Mayor Vanessa Fleisch and councilmen Terry Ernst, Kevin Madden and Phil Prebor. Photo/Ben Nelms.
The Peachtree City Council on Dec. 3 held an informal meeting to talk about potential future goals. Pictured, from left, are, Councilman Mike King, Mayor Vanessa Fleisch and councilmen Terry Ernst, Kevin Madden and Phil Prebor. Photo/Ben Nelms.

Council may decide on list of priorities beginning Dec. 12 — 

A lengthy Dec. 3 meeting of the Peachtree City Council to identify and prioritize short- and medium-term goals for the city’s future generated a long list of items to be presented to the council on Dec. 12 for their consideration.

In all, there were 47 items suggested, with City Manager Jon Rorie saying at the conclusion of the 4-hour meeting that he would confer with city staff to arrange the pertinent items in a spread sheet format so that the goals can be prioritized by council members on Dec. 12, along with the assignment of council members and staff with responsibility for the actions required to accomplish those goals.

The meeting was intended to be informal, with council members and city department heads sitting in a round-table arrangement, and with all offering suggestions on potential goals. Even the five residents in attendance offered their suggestions on potential goals for consideration.

As much as anything, the meeting served as an open-ended brainstorming session.

Rorie during the meeting noted that a number of the suggested goals were already included in actions being undertaken by the city.

Some examples of potential goals for consideration on Dec. 12 included:

• The use of license plate reader cameras by the police department on Ga. highways 54 and 74. Rorie noted that system would alert officers if the vehicle was involved in a crime or some form of violation, but would not be used to issue tickets. “We can’t use cameras to weaponize the police department,” Rorie added.

• The elimination of the recycling yard on Hwy. 74 South at Rockaway Road.

• The future of the bubble on the Kedron pool, an air-supported structure with a $750,000 price tag.

• A plan for the 58 acres on McIntosh Trail owned by the city, including the relocation of the city’s Public Works Department.

• The future of the Peachtree City Tennis Complex on Planterra Way.

• Potential work at the intersection of Huddleston Road and Hwy. 54, including grading, sewer and having two left-turn lanes onto Hwy. 54 West.

• Cart path connectivity on Hwy. 54 East from the cemetery path to the Peachtree East Shopping Center.

• Planning for the replacement of the golf cart bridge on Hwy. 54, and with the consideration that the pylons will have to be replaced in 15 years.

• Moving local elections to even-numbered years to increase voter turnout.

• The future dredging of Lake Peachtree.

The meeting can be viewed in its entirety at www.peachtree-city.org

1 COMMENT

  1. Praise be given when due. This is exactly the role for city council in a planned community. It is planning ahead, being proactive, whatever else you want to call it. Good for you – all of you and staff too!

    Not sure closing the recycling center is a good idea unless that’s where they plan to move public works, but repurposing the current public works and surrounding area is a great idea. So is getting rid of that stupid pool cover in Kedron. Total dredging of Lake Peachtree will be worthwhile as well – just be sure to deepen that area under the 54 bridge so surface drainage water and kayakers can move freely from Tinsley Mill condos to the lake. Probably a chance to create passive parks like Spyglass (formerly Snake) Island. That place is great and not very expensive to create or maintain.

    The land near the amphitheater (58 acres? – that’s huge) is a chance to continue innovative residential similar to what Strickland has proposed and I think gotten approved on Petrol Point. Selling off 20 acres for upscale lofts, cottages, bed and breakfast or similar makes perfect sense. Rental or ownership? Flats vs. mid-rise? High or medium density? Live/work usage? All good choices.
    Keep an open mind – take bids. City is in the driver’s seat. Great opportunity.

    Again, good to be doing this. For a while I was afraid that the dark forces that were shutting down recreation because our average age (meaning the residents) was so high. Glad those naysayers no longer have a voice. Do include some millennial input into the process in the true spirit of planning ahead. They are going to take over pretty soon. Help them, ok?