Senoia subdivision gets OK for 365 homes on Seavy St.

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Development layout for Senoia subdivision Keg Street Landing. Photo/City of Senoia.
Development layout for Senoia subdivision Keg Street Landing. Photo/City of Senoia.

The Keg Creek Landing subdivision on Seavy Street is one step closer to construction.

On Feb. 5, the Senoia City Council passed the preliminary plat and development agreement for the proposal that will create 356 homes near the intersection of Seavy Street and Ga. Highway 85.


Above, development layout for Senoia subdivision Keg Street Landing. Photo/City of Senoia.


As part of the project, the developer will pay for the realignment of Seavy Street with Hwy. 85. The developer will also pay for a traffic signal study at the intersection by the time 178 lots are built. If a signal is warranted, the developer will pay for the signal with a $300 per lot fee it puts in an escrow account.

Finally, the developer acknowledges a multi-use path through the development and agrees to offer path easements to the city at no cost.

In other action, the city denied an appeal from Curtis and Carlotta Murray for a fence at their home on Johnson Street.

Curtis Murray explained that he had built his fence out of PVC to cut down the costs of maintaining a wood fence. The city’s Historical Preservation Commission had denied the fence, maintaining it did not meet one of the building materials for a fence. Murray showed the City Council pictures of the fence, and while they admired the look, they could not approve something in violation of an ordinance.

Murray said PVC was not mentioned in the ordinance, and from there the discussion got heated. The city’s staff explained that Murray had been told three times to stop building the fence, but he continued.

Murray said he never spoke to City Manager Harold Simmons about the fence, and the conversation went downhill with both Simmons and Murray calling each other liars.

After the denial, the Murrays said they would be sending the city complaints about other fences they believed did not comply withe the city’s ordinance.