FIRST DAY OF PRE-PLANNING

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semolinapilchard
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Joined: 03/13/2013

When you walk in your classroom and you are handed a mask and bleach, one can only wonder what the rest of the year has in store! The first activity was to clean everything that you can reach, see or smell of the major mold that is growing in our school. Studies have shown that bleach is not recommended for cleaning mold and may, in fact, be an exercise in futility, a complete waste of teacher time, energy, and money for these supplies.

Further experts, (OHSA, EPA, CDC) say, among other things, when you use bleach to remove mold you're stirring up a concoction that can often make you sicker than the mold itself. Many different types of mold react to the chlorine in the bleach and create a gas. Although you can't see the gas you are breathing it. Just one episode with the mold and gas mixture is enough to do irreparable damage to the lungs. Even when your lungs are attacked by the harmful gas created by mixing bleach and mold you likely won't feel a thing. In addition to assorted lung issues the unhealthy combination can also leave you with severe migraines. Is the school system going to pay for the sick teachers who had to 'create this gas' all day? Is the school system going to foot the bill for students who become ill? Because absorbent or porous materials, such as wood furniture, ceiling tiles and carpet, may have to be thrown away if they become moldy. Mold can grow on or fill in the empty spaces and crevices of porous materials, so the mold may be difficult or impossible to remove completely, which is to say after all the cleaning and 'gassing' of people, the mold still survives.

I think someone needs to research this a little more and use common sense in eradicating this problem. For instance find the source of the moisture causing the mold and you will eliminate the problem.

Davids mom
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Joined: 10/30/2005
Really?
Quote:

Studies have shown that bleach is not recommended for cleaning mold and may, in fact, be an exercise in futility, a complete waste of teacher time, energy, and money for these supplies

Teachers were asked to do this? Was this a universal request or just a few classrroms, (or one school only)?

semolinapilchard
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Joined: 03/13/2013
MOLD

Yes ma'am teachers were asked to do this. I am unable to comment on other schools, only the school I in my district. Note: this same school has been in the news in the past regarding mold problems - - and years later nothing has been done, find that moisture and fix it. I feel certain the reason it was not done professionally this time is because that would have involved the county office - - at all cost don't involve the county office! My concern remains the health of students and teachers.

Robert W. Morgan
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Joined: 10/26/2005
It can begin by simply turning the AC off for 3 months

Professionals will certainly tell you not to use bleach at all. They have a fairly expensive product that is an extract of Australian tea leaves that sounds awful, does smell a bit like bleach and works great.

They will also tell you that shutting off the AC in an enclosed space is a sure-fire recipe for mold - especially with a much rain as we have had this year. The solution is to run the AC in all rooms about 1 hour a day to eliminate moist air every day before it can progress to mildew and mold. Once it gets into cardboard and paper (like the pages of a book), you will never get rid of it. I'm sure some school administrator thinks he is saving a bunch of money on utilities by shutting off the AC, but now he has to live with the unintended consequences.

Of course if there is a roof leak or other infiltration of water, the problem becomes 100 times worse.