210 apartments on F’ville agenda Thursday

Fayetteville’s entrée to the world of luxury apartments, those which include high-end amenities and concierge-level services, will be on the Fayetteville City Council’s agenda June 5. The first of two public hearings for the rezoning request will feature 210 luxury apartments at The Villages development located on Ga. Highway 54 at Lafayette Avenue just west of downtown.

The proposal received a preliminary review by the Fayetteville Planning and Zoning Commission in March and was tabled in April so commissioners could have several questions answered by planning staff. Those questions were answered by city community development director Brian Wismer at the May 27 meeting. Commissioners voted unanimously with no discussion to recommend the proposal to the city council.

The 11.6-acre property, located on the north side of Hwy. 54 between Lafayette Avenue on the east and Sharon Drive to the west, was rezoned in June 2011 under the PCD (planned community development) zoning designation for approximately 192 units which were slated for person 55 years of age and older. Those plans were later abandoned.

Though previously approved as a PCD project and because PCD approval is project-specific, the current proposal requires rezoning due to several factors. Those include a change in the footprint of the proposed buildings, the change in usage from age-restricted to non-age-restricted and the small increase in the number of proposed apartments.

A description in March of the luxury apartment proposal provided by Miles Hill, founder of The Charter Companies of Auburn, Alabama, represents a significant departure from the apartment complexes existing today in Fayetteville and Fayette County. The difference is not as much in some of the pricing as in the amenities that include a number of concierge services for all units with additional services available.

Promaker Development Group co-founder Rick Halbert told commissioners May 27 the Lafayette Square proposal represents a $43 million development.

The layout of the property shows four apartment buildings, each with three floors, and six carriage-style buildings. Two of the apartment buildings will border Hwy. 54 with one on the north side of the property and one in the center of the site. As proposed, two of the apartment buildings will contain 39 units each with the remaining two buildings containing 54 units each.

Five of the six carriage-style buildings will be located on the west side of the property nearer the homes on Sharon Drive. The carriage-style buildings include two floors, with the residences upstairs and two-car garages for each unit downstairs. Five of those will contain two apartments while the remaining building near the center of the property will contain three apartments.

Of the 210 proposed units, 24 are 1 bedroom/1 bathroom at 768-850 sq. ft., 174 are 2 bedrooms/2 bathrooms at 1,002-1,100 sq. ft. and 12 are 3 bedrooms/2 bathrooms at 1,287 sq. ft.

Projected monthly rent is $890-1,400 for 1-bedroom units, $1,050-1,950 for 2-bedroom units and $1,225 and up for the 3-bedroom units.

Intended as a community with monitored security gates and fences, Lafayette Square is proposed to feature a resort-style pool and deck, a 5,200 sq. ft. clubhouse, deck-side cabanas and hot tubs, several parks, landscaped courtyards, a fully-equipped business center and cyber cafe and tanning salon.

A number of concierge-level services to residents will be standard while others will require an additional fee. Among the services proposed are a laundry drop-off service, pet and plant sitting, a pet park, car wash and housekeeping services. A continental breakfast will be offered most mornings in the clubhouse, according to The Charter Companies.

The existing street infrastructure will accommodate traffic from the development, Hill said, adding that all roadways, water and sewer systems, drainage systems, parking area and amenities will be privately owned and maintained by the development. Plans also include the installation of two stormwater retention ponds.

As for potential tenants, Hill said previously that, “We’ve done a pretty extensive market survey and we feel very strongly about the market here.”

Hill on May 27 said a sampling of the target market includes corporate units designed to meet the needs of movie and television production companies filming in Fayetteville along with those working at Piedmont Fayette Hospital and Hartsfield-Atlanta Airport.

Peachtree City-based Historical Concepts is the design consultant for the project.

The first of two public hearings will be held Thursday. If approved by the council after the second public hearing on June 19, construction could begin in the fall and would include a construction period of 12-14 months.

father time
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There goes the Neighborhood

Apartments are never a good Idea. The tenants, in most cases are non property tax paying citizens, and for the most part, tend to not take care of their surroundings. I realize that the property owners pay the Property tax but Fayetteville has gone downhill enough. Stop the insanity now.

loanarranger707
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100 apartments flat out disappear

Of the 210 proposed units, 24 are 1 bedroom/1 bathroom at 768-850 sq. ft., 74 are 2 bedrooms/2 bathrooms at 1,002-1,100 sq. ft. and 12 are 3 bedrooms/2 bathrooms at 1,287 sq. ft.

24 + 74 + 12 = 110. What are the other 100 units? (Who was your math teacher?)

moelarrycurly
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loanranger-math teacher, part deux

Even more to your point. It also states two buildings with 54 units and two with 39 units each.

54 + 54 + 39 + 39 = 186. Where are the other 24 units?

Georgia Patriot
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Common Core Math

The solution is easy, you just divide the total units by the inverse of the hypotenuse by the tangent of the base! Of course this solution indicates some of the units will be built in Kneu York and Kalifornia but hey, it's easier.....right? -GP

Husband and Fat...
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I was thinking the same

We don't need no stinken common core math

Georgia Patriot
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H&F & Common Core

From what I have seen common core is another government solution to a problem that didn't exist.

Leave it up to the states and local school boards.

But what do I know, I went to school so long ago the only school board I was familiar with had holes drilled in it, all it took was one whack and amazing improvement in all subjects was seen. -GP

Husband and Fat...
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I don't like common core either

I prefer to challenge the kids to be more than average.

But I also see a need for something, so when a student transfers across state lines they aren't too far behind.

Common core isn't the answer.

BTW: I sometimes have trouble helping my kids with the way they teach certain math problems. And I deal with calculations every day.

NeilSullivan
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Common Core will do as a minimum (for now)

While I do not think common core is a hill to die on, it will serve as a minimum between states for now. We need to remember that it is meant to be a set of minimum standards between states and is not a ciriculum. Some have stated it is less than the old GA standards, the good news is then we can teach to the old standards maybe not in the order some would like.

My question is what is the alternative? How do we deal with students who move into and out of Georgia if each state has their own standard? How do we compete as a nation worldwide when we are to busy competing between states as to when and how a certain part of math is taught? Worse, how do we deterime how and what we need to teach our children so that they are competitive in the global job mart.

My experience with my fourth grader is mixed. I like some of the things they are doing as the practical application of math that I see in the business world. If left to my own devices I would run the world in Excel. However, the how they get there is more troubling to me and hope they refine some of the teaching technique.

BUT what I do see and like is the focus seems to be to reach all the children in some way versus teaching to the bottom or the top. We need public schools that focus on the needs of all of our children.

Davids mom
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Common Core

Thank you Mr. Sullivan. The beginning of the refining of the teaching techniques should be the responsibility of the educators on the college level - and not the publishers of math textbooks. Many institutions of higher learning are instructing aspiring educators how to teach, inspire, and encourage children during the learning process. We need the contributions of all of our children.

Quote:

We need to remember that it is meant to be a set of minimum standards between states and is not a ciriculum.

Fayette County standards already exceed the minimum.

moelarrycurly
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Well, if i lived in Fayetteville

which I don't so who cares, but if I did I would say we don't need these stinken apartments. Of course, this would be if we were thinking the same way which we do, sometimes, but not always. Not very common, but right to the core of the matter, is these are luxury apartments at bargain basement prices from a company from Alabama. What does that tell you? Sumtin don't add up. Promaker developer is backing this? Same guy as that Pinewood? Well, that should tell you sumtin right there. Gonna let him go two for two? Good luck with that.

Husband and Fat...
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It's got Pinewood all over it

I wouldn't want it either. This is nothing but dorms for the temporary workers at Pinewood. Notice they didn't say anything about the length of the leases. Anything under 1 year equals transient.

The prices are really good. Too good. I wonder if Pinewood is somehow providing any financing help? They have a lot of money to kick start things since they got such a good deal by the guy who skipped town.

As for the amenities, they are ho hum. Again it makes me think of convenience for the transient workers.

Fayetteville can have it.

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