Monday, Oct. 5, 2015    Login | Register           

Inman students get a first hand look at gardening from local experts close to home

Gardening is more than planting seeds in soil; knowledge of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) is needed to make a garden grow, as some students at Inman Elementary have learned.

Third, fourth and fifth grade students in Charlie Harper’s enrichment classes have planted a school garden as part of their Junior Master Gardening learning unit. With help from local businesses and gardeners, the students learned about much more than just plant life; they saw how math and science concepts they are learning were used to construct the garden, and that important life skills such as teamwork, communication and cooperation are essential to a successful project.

Three 4-by-10 feet raised beds make up the garden that was mostly donated and constructed by the Fayetteville Home Depot. The store donated and delivered hundreds of dollars worth of lumber and hardware, and sent nine store managers to the school where they spent an entire day constructing the garden beds.

“The students watched an amazing display of teamwork with real world applications of math and science, such as fractions, angles, and simple machines,” says Harper.

The managers also filled the beds with 120 cubic feet of soil that was donated by Farm Bureau. Additionally, The Fayette County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee and Young Farmers Committee donated $350 to purchase gardening soil, materials to build a deer fence around each bed, an irrigation system, and a variety of plant seeds.

Joanne Minter and her daughter, Stephanie Adamek, of Minter’s Farm taught the students some gardening basics before they planted vegetable seeds in the beds. Vegetables growing in the garden include carrots, cucumbers, radishes, lettuce, squash, zucchini, and peas.

Harper says he is grateful for the generosity of the community, and for all of the volunteers who came to Inman Elementary to make the garden a reality for his students.

“All of the students are thrilled to have beautiful, professionally built beds to work and learn in,” he says. “The raised beds will afford authentic academic experiences and invaluable life lessons for years to come.


Ad space area 4 internal

Sponsored Content


Writer’s block I knew one day it would happen. After 14 years and over 700 columns, something that strikes fear into this writer has finally arrived at our house: Writer’s block.


The Coweta Fairgrounds’ James E. McGuffey Nature Center will be the site of the first Fall Tree Festival, hosted by the Coweta Master Gardener Extension Volunteers Sunday, Oct. 25, 2-4 p.m.


Starr's Mill, Northgate and East Coweta are all unbeaten at the midpoint of the football season after their wins Friday night. Northgate is 6-0 while the other two teams are 5-0.


Sibling Class is a one-hour class for siblings, ages 2-10, accompanied by an adult. Topics include what to expect when Mom is in the hospital and when the baby comes home.